Writing

I've always been a compulsive writer. If it's not an academic paper, it's an essay. If not an essay, then a song. If not a song, then some poetry. If not poetry, then tons and tons of notes for later. 

I'll post more here soon, but here are some of my more well-formulated papers:

 

"Egypt's Vietnam" - A Case Study of Egypt's War in Yemen from 1962-1967

The Yemen War is often referred to as “Egypt’s Vietnam” by Egyptian military historians because of both the length of the engagement and Nasser’s futile attempts to end it by means of escalation. Egypt’s direct involvement and war against the Saudi backed Royalists proved to be a long and, ultimately, failing endeavor. Continue reading...

 

Memo on the Oslo Accords

The Israeli-Palestinian peace negotiations took a giant leap forward during Yitzhak Rabin's term as Israeli prime minister, with the commencement of the Oslo Peace Process. While no significant progress was being made in Washington in the bilateral talks agreed upon at the Madrid Conference in 1991, a secret unofficial channel began operating between Israelis and the PLO, under the auspices of Norway. Continue reading...

 

The Breakup of Standard Oil - The Case and the Controversy

In 1911. the Supreme Court of the United States held that because Standard Oil was operating an unreasonable restraint of trade, it was an illegal trust under the Sherman Anti-Trust Act of 1890. The most important consequence of Standard Oil, however, was not the actual breakup of the company and its subsidiaries. Continue reading...

 

Memo on the Quemoy Crisis

In 1949, with the Communists under Mao Tse-tung consolidating their grip on the country, deposed Chinese president Chiang Kai-shek led 1 million of his nationalist followers to Taiwan. The only thing he and Mao had in common was their insistence that Taiwan remained part of China. Continue reading...

 

The Case of Sacco and Vanzetti (and the role of Felix Frankfurter)

The trial of Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti in the 1920's is one of the most controversial in American legal history. Two Italian American immigrants, Sacco and Vanzetti were found guilty and executed for armed robbery and murder. Not only were the circumstances that surrounded their arrests dubious, based on xenophobia, but the trial itself reeked of perjury, judicial bias and prejudice. However, it was not until five years later[1] when a certain Harvard Law professor, Felix Frankfurter, took notice of the case. His analysis of the case was instrumental in creating the public uproar that saving the two men required. Continue reading...